My (very) first email

This story starts in December 1993.

The web, as we know it, was invented only three years earlier, in 1989/1990. At that time I was a student of electrical engineering at the Polytechnic of Milan, working on my final essay with a couple of colleagues. We selected Robotics as a topic. Specifically, our research was about mobile robots – programmable robots with wheels. Every day for six months we spent our afternoon hours at the Robotics lab, working on our programmable mobile robot (“Moro“: Mobile Robot).

Soon we discovered that one of the mainframes at the lab was connected to Usenet. We didn’t really know what “to be connected” really meant. We were told that it was possible to contact students and teams of other universities through a digital network. Usenet.

At that time we were stuck with our project. In fact, we had a problem with some specific curves, called clothoids. Clothoids are elements of the math theory behind mobile robot studies. We were not good with programming Moro’s wheels to follow a clothoidal path. We spent months trying to figure out what was wrong with it. No luck.

So we had an issue with the f***** clothoids and there was no literature to study or review. No internet. No wikipedia. No google. We wrote a few lines looking for help, and we sent that request along Usenet.

We didn’t know at that time, but it was our first email. It was December 1992. When did you sent your first email? I did 25 years ago.

Oh, and by the way: we got no answers. Few weeks later we found some answers to our problem in a public (analog) library. And yes. Eventually we got our degree, a few months later.

One more piece of the B2B Content Marketing Strategy series

A few days ago I wrote the post “How to integrate Public Relations into your B2B Content Marketing strategy“, which is an additional piece of my broader series about Global B2B Content Marketing Strategy, dissected in 13 steps (I know, I should change that number; I will add or remove some of the steps…):

Step 1: The Case for Change
Step 2: Finding the Optimal Balance Between Central and Local
Step 3: (Editorial Process) Why your Company needs an Editorial Board to empower its Content Strategy
Step 4: Defining Local Target Personas
Step 5: Selecting a Content Hub – why Blogs are still at the core of your Content Marketing Strategy
Step 6: Selecting a Content Marketing Platform
Step 7: Launching Big Rock content
Step 8: Content Distribution
Step 9: How to integrate Public Relations with your B2B Content Marketing Strategy
Step 10: Launching an Internal Communications Strategy
Step 11: Educating Marketers About Your Content Marketing Program
Step 12: Piloting Your Content Marketing Strategy
Step 13: Finally, Going Global

In addition, here are a few short summaries, for readers who will prefer shorter/faster readings:

B2B Content Marketing Strategy guide in 10 easy steps

How to Launch a B2B, Cross-Regional Global Content Marketing Strategy – published on NewsCred’s Insights in November 2016

globe

How Content Increased the Effectiveness of Our B2B Enterprise Marketing by 3x – published on Contently’s Content Strategist blog

B2B_content_journey

Why your Company needs an Editorial Board to empower its Content Strategy

Editorial boards are an old tradition at newspapers. In today’s digital marketing world, brands’ content editorial boards aren’t quite as influential but still serve a critical role in content marketing strategy. The post “Why your Company needs an Editorial Board to empower its Content Strategy” explains why and how to set up central and local editorial boards and is a subset of the broader post How to Launch a B2B, Cross-Regional Global Content Marketing Strategy – published on NewsCred’s Insights in November 2016.

The original plan in fact was to dissect the main post in several other more detailed sub-posts, to take a deeper look at individual pieces of a Global Content Strategy:

Step 1: Finding the Optimal Balance Between Central and Local
Step 2: Why your Company needs an Editorial Board to empower its Content Strategy
Step 3: Defining Local Target Personas
Step 4: Selecting a Content Hub
Step 5: Launching an Internal Communications Strategy
Step 6: Educating Marketers About Your Content Marketing Program
Step 7: Piloting Your Content Marketing Strategy
Step 8: Finally, Going Global

My slide deck for the Annual Content Marketing Summit

It’s not the best content that win: it’s the best promoted content”. Content Distribution and Amplification have a critical role in Content Marketing Strategy. My presentation summarizes the steps to define a proper distribution and amplification strategy for your content, with examples and best practices from a large enterprise.  Via SlideShare.

B2B Content Renaissance?

Just love this tweet.


My answer….

LinkedIn’s Sophisticated Marketer’s Podcast with Jason Miller

The podcast is public and has been shared everywhere across business social media – mostly Twitter and LinkedIn. I already wrote about the interview and the conversation we had, in my behind-the-scenes post. Now the podcast is public. You can download it here.

Love Jason’s podcast summary.

Listen in on the Conversation as Giuseppe and I Discuss:

The B2B Content Renaissance: As Giuseppe puts it, “We realized there is no boring industry, only boring content.” We discuss how B2B learned to love great content, and what it means for the industry.

The Three Stages of Global Content Marketing: Giuseppe shares the process he went through to kick off a global content program for Schneider.

The Big Rock Turkey Slice Model: Schneider has enjoyed amazing success with the model. Now they’re up to 5X the results they were seeing before. According to Giuseppe, the secret is to support existing campaigns with your Big Rock. That way you can get buy-in from upper management and keep your messaging consistent.

Maintaining a Global Editorial Board: There are 25 stakeholders on Giuseppe’s board, scattered across time zones and regions. He shares his secret for keeping everyone on the same page.

The Sweet Spot for Publishing Frequency: Is it daily? Bi-weekly? We discuss the importance of consistency and quality over a set frequency.

Proving ROI: Giuseppe shares how his team develops objectives and KPIs, then pulls data from multiple sources to show progress.

Giuseppe Caltabiano is an extremely sophisticated marketer, and he’s incredibly generous to share all he has learned from Schneider Electric’s success. You can find him on Twitter @giusec, and get more details on his marketing strategy with this NewsCred article.

The Role of Pilot Programs in Global Content Marketing

Just posted The Role of Pilot Programs in Global Content Marketing on LinkedIn Pulse. Which is a subset of the broader post How to Launch a B2B, Cross-Regional Global Content Marketing Strategy – published on NewsCred’s Insights in November 2016. Planning to dissect the main post in several other more detailed sub-posts, to take a deeper look at individual pieces of a Global Content Strategy:

Step 1: Finding the Optimal Balance Between Central and Local
Step 2: Establishing Local Editorial Boards
Step 3: Defining Local Target Personas
Step 4: Selecting a Content Hub
Step 5: Launching an Internal Communications Strategy
Step 6: Educating Marketers About Your Content Marketing Program
Step 7: Piloting Your Content Marketing Strategy
Step 8: Finally, Going Global

As a matter of fact: 1) global content marketing, 2) PR & content integration and 3) Keyword strategy/SEO are three of my major areas of focus for 2017. So expect thoughts, new content and posts on these 3 domains.

Disrupted

I have been intrigued by the last book I’ve read (“Disrupted“, Dan Lyons) and the full story behind, including the dramatic end – the last summer’s scandal in which former HubSpot executives allegedly attempted to obtain a predraft copy. Though federal investigators dropped the case without pressing any charges, the incident caused HubSpot to fire the CMO (Mike Volpe); the incident also led to the resignation of the VP of Content (Joe Chernov) and a pay cut for the CEO, “who knew about Volpe’s actions but failed to bring the ethical violation to the board’s attention in a timely fashion” reports the Boston Globe.

I think that whatever is your opinion about how things really went, everyone working in the content marketing / inbound marketing domain should read this book. A few interesting complimentary readings I found googling for Disrupted: a very balanced post by Dan Levy, Rand Fishkin of Moz who thinks that “it is almost certainly the case that Dan Lyons went into the Hubspot job seeking to parody the workplace and/or create satire“, an article from Fortune, and Undisrupted, the formal answer by Hubspot’s founders – and many many others.

But the thing is, as I said: everyone working in the content marketing domain should read this book and make his personal mind about it. Quoting Dan Levy: I don’t understand how can you work in our field and not read the book. Even if stings a little bit.

Speaker at Content Marketing World 2017!

Long time without writing on the blog. I am just back from New England, some new things happening, unfortunately not so much time to write and share. Best news of the day: I’ve been selected to speak at next Content Marketing World , taking place in Cleveland on Sept 6-7. It’s the largest and most crowded content marketing conference of the world. I will be speaking about how to define a global content marketing strategy with examples and best practices from my company. I plan to bring testimonials or videos from the countries. It’s going to be a fantastic event and I am so happy to be “on board”!